It’s Time to Tell Your Story

by Sheralyn

As a writer, there is one thing I know for certain: There are far too many stories in the world for me to even tell on my own.

Your story is one of them, yet so many people decide they either don’t have the skill or aren’t important enough to have their story told.

Hogwash.

I’m creating a series of journals that are going to help turn you into an expert storyteller so you can share those stories that are just waiting to get out.

I’m also creating a podcast to give instruction and answer questions as we go.

Listen to episode 1 here.

Listen to episode 2 here.

There will be several journals that will go along with this project. Each is designed to gather information you can use to remember and retell events with an accuracy that lures your reader in to your story and keeps them reading.

The first journal is the Days of Change journal. If you don’t have it, grab it now.

There’s never been a better time to write your story. So get the tools you need and let’s get started!

Days of Change (OUTOT #1)

by Sheralyn

I’ve published over a dozen books but I have never been more excited about a book I’ve created than I am for the Once Upon This One Time (OUTOT or #OUTOT) journal series I’ve bringing your way now.

I firmly believe it is time for people to tell their stories, which is a daunting task for many.

Where do you start? What do you say? What do you include? What do you leave on the cutting-room floor?

I’m going to help you with all this, but you’re going to need some information first — information only you know, and it needs to be stored in ways that you can find and record easily.

That’s what the Once Upon This One Time journal series is all about: Capturing events in ways that make it easy to write about later.

The first journal in the series is: DAYS OF CHANGE. This is a journal you ONLY write in when you experience a notable change in your life. When that happens, you fill in a one-sheet in the journal and that’s it.

Do this each time you have a big change and soon you will have a book that is filled only with days when your “normal” changed into something new, allowing you to see some of the influential days in your life in sequence.

Other journals will record other things, making everything easy to find when it’s time to write your story and I’ll be guiding and sharing things I’ve learned with you along the way.

And I am looking forward to helping you write your story in a captivating way that family, friends, and strangers will love to read.

Start by clicking on the link and getting your copy of DAYS OF CHANGE now.

Talking Poetry

Ask anyone who’s known me all my life and they’ll attest to the fact that I have never self-identified as a poet.

Yet as I get to know the fictional characters I write for, I find myself describing their POVs (points of view) in poetic fashion.

Or, as I like to call it: Poetisophical™ — philosophical bedrock that allows you to deduce the state of heart.

This is a little different than traditional poetry, in my opinion. Maybe it’s actually poetry upside-down.

Poetry is known for its invitation to sit for a moment in someone else’s experience. Good poetry inspires sympathy or empathy in the listener — transporting them into a vicarious experience that allows them to see something in a new way.

My “poetisophical” poetry is a bit different in that the genesis is often the motives of fictional characters in a story. They might be the good guy, they might be the bad guy, or they might be some form of chaotic neutral in the middle.

But they have their points of view and their motives, and the poems I write often speak to the bedrock of their character.

Then, to beat the character in the story, you must beat their bedrock.

Here’s one such poetisophical poem that has most people split 50/50 on loving it and hating it.

What do you think?

CHASING DOGMA

By: Sheralyn Pratt

A truth
becomes a lie
the moment it arrives.
For truth cannot be stopped
—sometimes it is,
sometimes it’s not—
it holds its space
and plays its part
but holding still
is not its art.
For truth is on the move, you see,
it has things to prove
and places to be.
So if you spot it once
and proudly mark its plot,
remember this:
 truth cannot be caught.

Like the poem? Here it is in a shareable image:

A truth
becomes a lie 
the moment it arrives. 
For truth cannot be stopped
—sometimes it is, 
sometimes it’s not—
it holds its space 
and plays its part 
but holding still 
is not its art.
For truth is on the move, you see, 
it has things to prove 
and places to be. 
So if you spot it once 
and proudly mark its plot, 
remember this:
 truth cannot be caught.

Copyright: Sheralyn Pratt

Like it? Hate it? Start a conversation.

Chasing Dogma, Copyright Sheralyn Pratt 2019